Helping clients manage their technology for over 30 years.

What’s holding back the shift to Cloud Computing?

Factors Impacting Cloud Migration

By any measure, Cloud Computing represents a big change in how IT does things — and by definition, change carries a friction quotient. What’s the friction quotient when it comes to Cloud Computing? Here are a couple of takes, where you’ll notice a few common themes:

This one, from IBM’s 2011 Tech Trends study, shows that concerns about security are top-of-mind for those moving to Cloud Computing …

Similar concerns show up in other research. And still other research has additionally pointed to lack of customization and an excess of Cloud capacity.

Overall, the themes here are apparent: Those venturing into Cloud Computing are worried chiefly about …

  • Security,
  • The ability to sustain a consistently-performing technology infrastructure (that’s what compatibility and interoperability concerns are really about; it’s also what performance, reliability, complexity, extendibility, and lack of customization concerns are really about),
  • Privacy and compliance, and
  • Cost, which is where vendor lock-in, pricing, and expense come in.

Given these sorts of hesitations about Cloud Computing, it’s worthwhile to consider that they might be addressed with the right kind of Cloud Computing. Which is exactly what I’ll be doing in my next blog.

By any measure, Cloud Computing represents a big change in how IT does things — and by definition, change carries a friction quotient. What’s the friction quotient when it comes to Cloud Computing? Here are a couple of takes, where you’ll notice a few common themes:

This one, from IBM’s 2011 Tech Trends study, shows that concerns about security are top-of-mind for those moving to Cloud Computing …
Top Security Concerns that Impact Migration to the Cloud

Similar concerns show up in other research. And still other research has additionally pointed to lack of customization and an excess of Cloud capacity.
Impact of Lack of Customization and Excess Capacity on Cloud Migration

Overall, the themes here are apparent: Those venturing into Cloud Computing are worried chiefly about …

  • Security,
  • The ability to sustain a consistently-performing technology infrastructure (that’s what compatibility and interoperability concerns are really about; it’s also what performance, reliability, complexity, extendability, and lack of customization concerns are really about);
  • Privacy and compliance, and
  • Cost, which is where vendor lock-in, pricing, and expense come in.

Given these sorts of hesitations about Cloud Computing, it’s worthwhile to consider that they might be addressed with the right kind of Cloud Computing. Which is exactly what I’ll be doing in my next blog.

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