Helping clients manage their technology for over 30 years.

Security holes that’ll keep you up at night: Doing some data breach math

Data Breach Threats Faced By Business IT Infrastructure

Over the last few weeks, I’ve taken a look at what you can do to boost your organization’s IT security. But it occurs to me that maybe I’ve put the cart before the horse.

So I’m going to spend the next few weeks delving into the sort of threats your business’s IT infrastructure faces. And I’m going to start with data breaches and the most recent big-headline example: Zappos (parent company is, which last month admitted it suffered a data breach that compromised 24 million customer accounts.

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Quest’s 10 ways to boost business IT security in 2012: #9 and #10

Ways to boost Business IT Security

For quite some time, small and midsized businesses dared to feel safe from most malicious attacks — thanks to their relative smallness. Over the last couple of years, that’s been changing, because larger firms are tightening defenses and, as I’ve said before, the bad guys exploit opportunity.

Which is why shoddy IT security is a wide open opportunity for hackers to rip you off.

So I’m finishing our list with two elements easily overlooked as you face the hassles of keeping up with criminal creativity.

#9 Educate your employees about security

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Prosperity in 2012: Best-performing organizations use cloud computing

I recently came across a cloud computing benefit/risk study conducted in the first half of 2011 by the IT Policy Compliance Group (ITPCG). It shows that best-performing organizations (which see higher profits and suffer fewer business disruptions and less data loss) use cloud computing significantly more than poor-performing organizations.

More than two-thirds of best performers use cloud computing — about half opting for private clouds, while 25% use hybrid clouds and another 25% use public clouds. By contrast, only 9% of worst performers use cloud computing.

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Data backup/recovery best practice #10

This last of my backup/recovery best practices is far from the least of them:

#10 Conduct regular testing and reviews of your data recovery capabilities

Backups can be corrupted (especially if they’re tape-based) and too often backups are performed incorrectly. Key files, directories, or components may have been excluded, especially if your infrastructure has undergone adds or deletes.

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Data backup/recovery best practices #6, #7, #8, and #9

Continuing with my views of backup/recovery best practices, I offer up # 6 through #9:

#6 Back up your data locally as well as remotely.

Data restores usually are faster from a local backup source than a remote one, especially for data that you recover frequently.

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Data backup/recovery best practices #3, #4, and #5

Last time, I described the first two backup/recovery best practices. Here are the next three:

#3 Make sure your backup/recovery strategy adheres to all governance and compliance rules that apply to your organization.

Rules abound about data privacy, security, retention — and vary by industry and region. Look for a reputable advisor who has the experience needed to understand your compliance environment and who successfully completes SAS-70 Type II audits.

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Backup/recovery best practices #1 and #2

As I see it, there are 10 best practices that can make the difference between backups that really do keep you in business and backups that seem to work okay — until you actually try to use them. Here are the first two:

#1 Understand your data so you can decide what needs to be backed up and how often.

Base your decisions on the cost of loss, which you can get a sense of by noting the types of data your business relies on — emails, spreadsheets, databases, line-of-business apps, etc. — and determining the impact of losing that information for good and having to recreate it (if you can). Add in the cost of unhappy customers and potential regulatory/compliance violations — and do the math.

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Being thankful for backups

Thanksgiving is a time for giving thanks, eating turkey, and enjoying the fellowship of family and friends. And no one wants the holiday ruined by a call like this…

“All our customer files have evaporated. As have everyone’s email messages, all pending customer orders, and the accounts receivables database.”

Would you be able to reconstruct that data from scratch? Or, worse, try to move on without it?

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Quest CTO Mike Dillon to speak at Global Conference on Disaster Management

Our Chief Technology Officer, Mike Dillon, will be part of the all-day Global Conference on Disaster Management on November 10 at the Marriott Union Square Hotel in San Francisco.

Mike will discuss how cloud/managed services providers can make all the difference when it comes to protecting and preserving the information and digital applications on which your business depends.

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Trick or treat — or paradigm shift? What do you want to accomplish on your way to the cloud?

Anybody seeking to overcome the limits of traditional IT environments and streamline their business has to consider one of the most significant paradigm shifts of our time — cloud computing.

But take note: Cloud computing takes planning, because each move to the cloud is unique.

To figure out whether cloud computing will deliver what you need, ask yourself, “What do I want to accomplish?”

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