Helping clients manage their technology for over 30 years.

What Kind of Cloud Customer Are You?

When clients contemplating a move to the cloud ask for advice, we tell them to start by being realistic about what cloud computing actually offers.

Yes, the cloud frees budgets from constant investment in infrastructure, reducing CapEx expenditure.

But the cloud is a technology, not a solution that will automatically deliver benefits like faster time-to-market or streamlined methods or a fix for personnel or process issues within your enterprise.

Next, we advocate a know thyself approach. You’ll get the most out of a cloud implementation by understanding what you’re trying to accomplish. Be honest about your strengths and weaknesses.

If you’re certain about having access to the technical talent you’ll need to get from purchase to actual delivery of services, then go it alone.

If you’re less certain about what to do once you’ve ordered up servers and terabytes of data, you’ll want some help — which brings us to the last bit of advice: know thy cloud provider.

Cloud providers, like cloud computing itself, come in a dizzying array of options.

So don’t let a cloud provider tell you there’s only one way to get something done. Those vendors are trying to sell you their product rather than a solution that fits your business.

But you can in fact get exactly what you need without giving up the economies of scale the cloud promises. Ask a trusted technology advisor how.

Desktop Virtualization Services: More Options Than You May Realize

As we watch dreams of mobility coming true around us every day, the appeal of desktop virtualization is obvious. Pile on seemingly perpetual Windows end-of-life concerns, and that appeal only grows.

VDI — virtual desktop infrastructure — enables enterprises to optimize costs by continuing use of legacy systems, while also running the latest applications and remotely publishing them to any device. Managing VDI is complex, however – the acquisition, care, and feeding of its infrastructure is costly and demands expertise many do not have.

Enter desktop virtualization services, which take VDI either wholly or partly into the cloud. Continue reading

Are you buying a service — or an illusion?

Handshake in gray

Imagine discovering that for the last 12 months none of your company data had been backed up at your designated co-lo.

Worse, you only found this out because your corporate site has suffered a catastrophic failure. All your data has been lost — and you have no way to retrieve it.

You’re outraged, of course, and you want answers. How could your co-lo provider fail to back up your data? What about your provider’s vaunted disaster recovery service? Who is responsible for allowing this to happen?  Continue reading

Why DaaS delivers simplification — and safety

globe computers and clouds

As the end of Windows XP support looms ever closer, I’m getting more questions about DaaS — desktops as a service.

And for good reason: With cloud-based desktops as a service, you can tick several boxes at once and save money in the process — as much as 20%-to-30% over five years when you move from a physical desktop infrastructure to DaaS.

Of course, since DaaS is a hosted service, you avoid the upfront CapEx of a homegrown virtual desktop infrastructure. But three other major benefits may be even more important to some organizations:

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DaaS vs. VDI — Is This the Right Question?

Deciding between two doors

Which is the better solution — DaaS or VDI?

Each camp promotes its approach and dismisses the other while analysts argue about which one will “prevail.” Yet these technology debates do little more than distract you from finding the best solution for your organization.

So pull your eyes from those tech specs and focus on these six questions:
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Cloud Computing best practice: Understand available Cloud capabilities

Various cloud icons - cloud in center surrounded by monitors, laptops, etc

I’ve posted before about Cloud computing best practices, and I’m doing it again now (and for the next several posts) for a couple of reasons:

  1. Cloud computing continues to (quickly) evolve, and while some Cloud best practices stay more or less constant, others must be adapted to keep pace,
  2. Cloud success depends on adhering to best practices — so there’s no such thing as talking too much about them or the order in which they should be applied.

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How to find out if DaaS is right for your business — part 1 of 2

Free Desktop as Service (DaaS) Proof of Concept by Quest

For those who are ready to explore Desktop-as-a-Service, it’s worthwhile to find a DaaS-competent Cloud services provider who is willing to work with you to conduct a no-cost DaaS Proof-Of-Concept at your premises using you applications, data, and devices — and involving your employees.

There really is no other way to learn what your business can get from DaaS. A free DaaS Proof-of-Concept will help you understand very concretely how DaaS will work for your employees and what they’ll get from it. Using an iPad as part of your DaaS Proof-Of-Concept can be a wow! experience.

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5 DaaS FAQs — and the answers worth noting

FAQs on Desktops as a Service (DaaS)

These are some of the most common questions I get asked about Desktop-as-a-Service — and here are my answers.

  • Q. What end-user devices can we use to access our virtual desktops?
    A. Quest’s DaaS lets you use just about all of them: Any Wintel or Mac computer or laptop, iPhones, iPads, Android phones, and Android tablets. It even works on a Kindle Fire.
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Do you need DaaS? 5 hints to look out for

5 Capabilities To Look Out for in a DaaS Solution

I saw a sign recently with these six words: Change, of any sort, requires courage.

Change can be so difficult that sometimes we’d prefer to convince ourselves that it’s unnecessary. If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it, right?

But how do you know it ain’t broke? Complex systems and (infra)structures often fool us with their own forms of what amounts to landscape amnesia: By inches, conditions deteriorate, and this happens so slowly and in such small increments that we do not notice.

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